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Speech of a daughterHome » 4-10-2011......................so, too, a person’s compassion should be upon all the creations of th

4-10-2011......................so, too, a person’s compassion should be upon all the creations of the Blessed One.

A small piece out of : Tomer Devora [Cordovero-Ramak] chapter 3, "nothing new" maybe,  but extreme important for all of us to fully realize this beautiful Tora wisdom [chochma] again and again.
Furthermore, one’s compassion should extend to all creatures and he should neither despise nor destroy them, for the Supernal chochmah spreads over all of creation: inanimate objects, plants, animals and humans.  For this reason, we are warned by our Sages against treating food disrespectfully. This is a proper concept, for just as the Supernal chochmah does not despise anything that exists, since everything is created from it – as it is written, “You have made them all with chochmah” (Tehillim 104:24), so, too, a person’s compassion should be upon all the creations of the Blessed One.  For this reason, Rabbi Yehudah “the Holy One” was punished, because he did not have pity on a calf that hid by him under his cloak, in order to evade slaughter, and he said to it, “Go! You were created for this purpose,” (Bava Metzia 85a).  Suffering – which derives from the aspect of strict judgment – came upon him.  For only compassion shields against strict judgment.  Thus, when he had mercy on a weasel, and said “His compassion is upon all His creations” (Tehillim 145:9), he was delivered from strict judgment, for the light of chochmah spread over him, and his suffering was removed.
 
Similarly, one should not disparage any creature that exists, for all of them were created with chochmah. Nor should one uproot plants or kill animals unless they are needed.  And one should choose a noble death for them, using a carefully inspected sharp knife, in order to be merciful as much as possible.
 
This is the general principle: Having pity on all beings not to hurt them, is contingent on chochmah. Except, when elevating them to a higher level – from plant to animal, or from animal to human – then it is permissible to uproot a plant or slaughter a live animal, causing damage in order to bring merit.